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  • Secondary enuresis
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Asked by: Anonymous on 24 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
I am 23 years old and I have problems.wetting the bed I dry night and they help but how long will the problem stay on.for
As embarrassing and frustrating as this may seem you are not alone. There are thousands of people, including teenagers and adults, who wet the bed at night while they are asleep. This is not conscious wetting and therefore in no way your fault. There are a number of reasons why bed wetting may continue into adulthood. You do not mention in...
Asked by: Anonymous on 24 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
I am 23 years old and I have problems.wetting the bed I dry night and they help but how long will the problem stay on.for


As embarrassing and frustrating as this may seem you are not alone. There are thousands of people, including teenagers and adults, who wet the bed at night while they are asleep. This is not conscious wetting and therefore in no way your fault. There are a number of reasons why bed wetting may continue into adulthood. You do not mention in your question whether this is something recent or you have been experiencing this over a number of years. A sudden onset of bedwetting after years of being dry may be an indictor of some underlying medical condition or it may result from stress or anxiety so it is essential that you have this checked by your doctor. Given your age and the frequency of your wetting, it is unlikely that this will stop on its own accord. Please use the time with your doctor to discuss the possibility of introducing a conditioning alarm and these experience the best outcomes with respect to treatment options.

Kind Regards,

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  • Boy
  • 8-15
  • Secondary enuresis
Asked by: Rachael on 21 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
My daughter wees all over the floor and wees her bed
What you describe in your question may be deliberate wetting or it may be in response to an uncontrolled bladder. This is quite unusual, although not unheard of. On the rare occasion nighttime or daytime wetting may be a cry for attention. This may be in response to a stressful situation such as school bullying, family breakdown or environmental stress. I would...
Asked by: Rachael on 21 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
My daughter wees all over the floor and wees her bed

What you describe in your question may be deliberate wetting or it may be in response to an uncontrolled bladder. This is quite unusual, although not unheard of. On the rare occasion nighttime or daytime wetting may be a cry for attention. This may be in response to a stressful situation such as school bullying, family breakdown or environmental stress. I would encourage you to make an appointment for her to been seen by her GP.The first step is to determine whether her wetting is the result of an underlying medical issue or is a psychological response. 

Kind Regards,

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  • Boy
  • 4-7
  • Daytime wetting
  • Treatments
Asked by: Anonymous on 20 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
I rule like to know what is the more absorbent for night time bed wetting. Huggies pull ups, huggies dry notes or huggies junior nappies?
The difference between Pull-Ups and DryNites is that Pull-Ups are specifically designed for toilet training and daytime use. They have a built-in wetness liner that allows the children to feel when they are wet, which is why your son would be developing eczema as they urine is staying next to his skin rather than being drawn away. DryNites are specifically...
Asked by: Anonymous on 20 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
I rule like to know what is the more absorbent for night time bed wetting. Huggies pull ups, huggies dry notes or huggies junior nappies?

The difference between Pull-Ups and DryNites is that Pull-Ups are specifically designed for toilet training and daytime use. They have a built-in wetness liner that allows the children to feel when they are wet, which is why your son would be developing eczema as they urine is staying next to his skin rather than being drawn away. DryNites are specifically designed for nighttime use and offer a high level of absorbancy, drawing the urine away form children’s skin in much the same way as a Huggies nappy does. You will find the DryNites while offering a similar level of absorbency to the Huggies napies are more appropriate for bedwetting as they are designed for use by older children and appear more like an underpant than nappy.

Kind Regards,


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  • Boy
  • 4-7
  • Bedwetting alarms
Asked by: Anonymous on 18 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
I've had bladder issues since I started working in the wash bay at work. They have me working in there two of three days a week and in the shop the other coupe days. I get up to use the bathroom more often in the night after a day in the wash bay, and I have been bedwetting at least...
You are experiencing what is commonly referred to as secondary nocturnal enuresis. This term is used to describe the condition where an individual begins to wet the bed after experiencing a significant period of nighttime continence. There are a number of possible causes some of which are medical so it is very important that you make an appointment with your GP....
Asked by: Anonymous on 18 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
I've had bladder issues since I started working in the wash bay at work. They have me working in there two of three days a week and in the shop the other coupe days. I get up to use the bathroom more often in the night after a day in the wash bay, and I have been bedwetting at least ounce a week usually after a day in the wash bay.

You are experiencing what is commonly referred to as secondary nocturnal enuresis. This term is used to describe the condition where an individual begins to wet the bed after experiencing a significant period of nighttime continence. There are a number of possible causes some of which are medical so it is very important that you make an appointment with your GP. Secondary bedwetting can also result from stress, which can occur when we experience a significant change in our lives such as starting a new job or shifting responsibilities in the workplace - which may explain why this began when you started working in the wash bay at work. I would recommend discussing this with your GP. If stress is a contributing factor, it is not unusual for your bedwetting to stop when you are feeling more at ease or whatever is causing the stress is resolved. All the best!

Kind Regards,

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  • Boy
  • 8-15
  • Secondary enuresis
Asked by: Nicola on 13 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
My almost 6 year old girl still wears a nappy at night and it is wet 99% of the time. Toilet training was a nightmare with her, she would have frequent accidents and jsut didn't seem to care if they were clean or dirty pants. I wonder if she is waking and doing wees on waking or if she is...
Dear Nicola, it is perfectly normal for your daughter to still be wetting the bed at night with at least 1 in 7 6-year-olds continuing to wet the bed on a regular basis. The most common cause of nighttime wetting is a neurological-developmental delay. Young children whose nervous systems are still forming may not be able to know when their bladder is full....
Asked by: Nicola on 13 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
My almost 6 year old girl still wears a nappy at night and it is wet 99% of the time. Toilet training was a nightmare with her, she would have frequent accidents and jsut didn't seem to care if they were clean or dirty pants. I wonder if she is waking and doing wees on waking or if she is weeing in the night too. We have started a sticker chart for 'get up, go wees' but that hasn't encouraged her either. I think she might just be lazy but don't want to make a huge deal of it in case there is more to it. Would an alarm system work in this case?

Dear Nicola, it is perfectly normal for your daughter to still be wetting the bed at night with at least 1 in 7 6-year-olds continuing to wet the bed on a regular basis. The most common cause of nighttime wetting is a neurological-developmental delay. Young children whose nervous systems are still forming may not be able to know when their bladder is full. Consequently, they do not wake up in time to go to the toilet. Other children wet the bed because they produce double the amount of urine overnight, while others may do so due to a small bladder capacity. The most important thing to recognize about bedwetting is that it is uncontrolled – that is, children wet when they are asleep, which is why things like punishment or incentives have little effect. The majority of children your daughter's age will outgrow bedwetting on their own without the need for treatment. You can encourage a healthy bladder by making sure she drinks plenty of water throughout the day, eats lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and limits fizzy drinks – particularly before bedtime. While treatment is not typically recommended until children reach the age of 7 years, if bedwetting impacts on children’s emotional wellbeing or has reached a point where you're struggling to cope then it is time to consider treatment options. The first step is to consult with your local GP – they will most likely run some tests first to ensure there is no underlying physical cause following this she can start on a treatment program.  All the best!

Kind Regards,

Dr Cathrine

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  • Boy
  • 4-7
  • Bedwetting alarms
Asked by: Amanda on 13 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
Hi Dr Catherine, I have a question about my almost 4 year old girl and her wetting of a night. If she is in a nappy or pull up she remains dry and wont wet, so we know that she is capable of being dry. But as soon and she wears undies to bed she wets 2 - 3 times...
As frustrating as this may be please be reassured that this is perfectly normal. As children move toward achieving permanent nighttime continence it is common for them to waiver between periods of dryness then return to wetting again. It is not unusual for children to start wetting again at times of sickness or if they become overtired as this makes...
Asked by: Amanda on 13 Apr 2016 Answered: 16 Jun 2016
Hi Dr Catherine, I have a question about my almost 4 year old girl and her wetting of a night. If she is in a nappy or pull up she remains dry and wont wet, so we know that she is capable of being dry. But as soon and she wears undies to bed she wets 2 - 3 times a night. We are just after some other ideas to try. Do you think it could be the difference in pressure she is feeling from her pullup to her undies causing this? Any ideas would greatly appreciated. Thanks Amanda

As frustrating as this may be please be reassured that this is perfectly normal. As children move toward achieving permanent nighttime continence it is common for them to waiver between periods of dryness then return to wetting again. It is not unusual for children to start wetting again at times of sickness or if they become overtired as this makes it more difficult for them to wake in response to a full bladder. I am a little puzzled however as to why this is only occurring when she is wearing underpants? Is your pre-bed routine any different on the nights she wears underpants? The decision of whether or not to return to using DryNites is really up to you. Why there has been some debate surrounding the use of absorbent pants – there really is no convincing research to show that these prolong the bedwetting process.

Kind Regards, 

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  • Boy
  • 2-4
  • Secondary enuresis
Asked by: Anonymous on 24 Aug 2015 Answered: 04 Feb 2016
My older teen has nf1 and has his sleep disrupted by frequent nite time bathroom usage both poo and wee and wakes up at 3 am unable to go back to sleep.
It is not unusual for children with developmental delays to develop nighttime continence somewhat later than the usual age range. The majority of these children do outgrow this on their own. However given how disrupted his sleep has become, the sooner we find a solution the better! Recent research points to the absence of ADH (antidiuretic hormone) as a cause...
Asked by: Anonymous on 24 Aug 2015 Answered: 04 Feb 2016
My older teen has nf1 and has his sleep disrupted by frequent nite time bathroom usage both poo and wee and wakes up at 3 am unable to go back to sleep.

It is not unusual for children with developmental delays to develop nighttime continence somewhat later than the usual age range. The majority of these children do outgrow this on their own. However given how disrupted his sleep has become, the sooner we find a solution the better! Recent research points to the absence of ADH (antidiuretic hormone) as a cause of nighttime wetting/output - children without ADH produce four times the amount of urine as those who have the hormone and are therefore at a greater likelihood of ‘overfilling’ their bladder at night. In general, we find that children stop wetting at night when their bodies become better able at storing the urine overnight. If you are at all concerned about his bladder capacity you can have this checked by his GP. This is usually done by having your son drink, and then measuring his urine output when he says he needs to go to the toilet. Given his age and the fact that he needs to empty his bladder and bowels so frequently, I would recommend following this up with his GP. Some children who experience encopresis (uncontrolled soiling) may benefit from restricting certain foods from their diet. There are a number of ways you can try and determine whether food intolerances are contributing to his nighttime bladder/bowel habits. The easiest (and safest) approach would be to visit a Naturopath. They may recommend you begin an elimination diet, removing all foods from his diet that could be affecting his bedwetting, then you carefully reintroduce the foods, one at a time. It is always important to remember, each child is unique and what works for one does not necessarily work for all. All the best!

Regards,
Dr Cathrine

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  • Boy
  • 8-15
  • Special needs
  • Teenager
Asked by: katie on 22 Aug 2015 Answered: 15 Dec 2015
I have just starting wetting the bed of middle of may his year I don't know what has come over me and now I am asking what can I do I have been to my doctor serval times saying this is happening I wear drynites at bed now but I don't know why this is happening
You are experiencing what is commonly termed secondary bedwetting – this simply refers to a situation where an individual has been dry for 6 months or more then begin wetting the bed again. The first thing to think about here is what has changed? Secondary bedwetting has a number of possible causes, which include both physical and psychological. Medical causes...
Asked by: katie on 22 Aug 2015 Answered: 15 Dec 2015
I have just starting wetting the bed of middle of may his year I don't know what has come over me and now I am asking what can I do I have been to my doctor serval times saying this is happening I wear drynites at bed now but I don't know why this is happening
You are experiencing what is commonly termed secondary bedwetting – this simply refers to a situation where an individual has been dry for 6 months or more then begin wetting the bed again. The first thing to think about here is what has changed? Secondary bedwetting has a number of possible causes, which include both physical and psychological. Medical causes can be something as simple as a urinary tract infection or something more serious such as diabetes so it is very important that you have a thorough medical assessment. Stress can also contribute to bedwetting. It is not uncommon for people to wet the bed at times of high stress. If stress is a contributing factor then the bedwetting usually stops when whatever is causing the stress resolves itself. If the bedwetting continues and you are able to rule out any of these factors then the management and treatment of secondary bedwetting is much the same as primary bedwetting. You can access information through the DryNites website on the different treatment options available to you. All the best! Regards, Dr Cathrine
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  • Boy
  • 8-15
  • Doctor
  • Secondary enuresis
Asked by: chloe on 22 Aug 2015 Answered: 15 Dec 2015
I was wondering if they are different in any way apart from pattern because I am transgender and I would be a lot happier in girls but I don't want them too leak at night. Also I get erections in the night, can dry nights deal with this?
Both the boys and girls DryNites offer similar levels of absorbency however they do differ in terms of the pattern of absorbency with the boys DryNites offering a greater concentration in the front. I would recommend you request a free sample of both the boys and girls so you can compare the relative functionality of each. Regards, Dr Cathrine
Asked by: chloe on 22 Aug 2015 Answered: 15 Dec 2015
I was wondering if they are different in any way apart from pattern because I am transgender and I would be a lot happier in girls but I don't want them too leak at night. Also I get erections in the night, can dry nights deal with this?
Both the boys and girls DryNites offer similar levels of absorbency however they do differ in terms of the pattern of absorbency with the boys DryNites offering a greater concentration in the front. I would recommend you request a free sample of both the boys and girls so you can compare the relative functionality of each. Regards, Dr Cathrine
More
  • Boy
  • 8-15
Asked by: Anonymous on 17 Aug 2015 Answered: 15 Dec 2015
While it is perfectly fine to use DryNites to help manage your daytime wetting it is important to understand that these will not help you to stop wetting. If you do choose to wear them I would recommend wearing loose fitting pants, to avoid any chance of discovery. You will also need to change them regularly to avoid leakage or...
Asked by: Anonymous on 17 Aug 2015 Answered: 15 Dec 2015
While it is perfectly fine to use DryNites to help manage your daytime wetting it is important to understand that these will not help you to stop wetting. If you do choose to wear them I would recommend wearing loose fitting pants, to avoid any chance of discovery. You will also need to change them regularly to avoid leakage or odour. I would recommend speaking with a trusted teacher so that he or she can support you during this time. Try and make time to use the toilet regularly as this will reduce daytime accidents. Any type of daytime wetting at your age should be assessed by a GP, have a chat with your parents and have them make an appointment for you. You can use this opportunity to discuss ways to help you to stop. Regards, Dr Cathrine
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  • Boy
  • 8-15
  • Daytime wetting
  • Teenager

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